Reading This Week

“Search for the New Land” by Morgan Parker, in the Feb 21 issue of The New York Review of Books – This poem moved me so much that I went to a bookstore within the hour and bought Parker’s poetry collection, “There Are More Beautiful Things Than Beyonce.”

Discovering Words by Neepin Auger – This is a wonderful picture book for very young children (approx. 0-2). There is one illustration per page, and each illustration is described in English, French, and Cree. This is a must-have book for children living in Canada.

Trail of Crumbs by Lisa J. Lawrence

Continuing my read of Vice, Crime, and Poverty by Dominique Kalifa – This book prompted me to read the entire Wikipedia article on the Black Death. Yikes.

Reviews from this week:

Anna at the Art Museum by Hazel Hutchins

Diana Dances by Luciano Lozano 

The Learning Curve by Mandy Berman

Reading this Week

Learning Curve – Mandy Berman

An excerpt from Tom Pickard’s “Fiends Fell” from the February 2019 issue of Poetry Magazine – I keep trying to get to the end, but I keep getting hypnotized by the gorgeous photos.

Hedgehog Needs a Hug by Jen Betton – Our household has been reading and re-reading this, but, alas, it must now be returned to the library.

Cameron Anstee’s Book of Annotations (for the second time!)

Flipping my way through Danish author Asta Olivia Nordenhof’s the easiness and the loneliness, realizing how amazing it would be for all literary translations to have the source language next to the translated text.

Titles reviewed this week:

A Boy and A House by Maja Kastelic

Permission by Saskia Vogel

My Cat Looks Like My Dad by Thao Lam

Reading this Week

This week’s reading list…

“I Met Fear on the Hill” by Leslie Jamison, an essay in the newest Paris Review (Winter 2018) – A piece investigating the events in the life of the author’s mother through an unpublished manuscript

On page 282 of Knausgaard’s My Struggle (Book Six: The End) – Update: approaching the Hitler section… wondering what to do

Khaled Mattawa’s “The Boat Merchant’s Wife” from the latest issue of Poetry magazine – There’s an enlightening episode of the Poetry Magazine podcast featuring this poem.

Also.

My employer suggested we all post the answer to this question: “If you were trapped on a desert island, what book would you hope to have with you?”

Simple question, right? WRONG. I literally have no idea. I lost sleep over this question last night. Like, do I take along all of the Knausgaard books, just to have a ton of reading material? Do I take a book of poetry to read again and again? The collected works of Shakespeare?

Could I bring a novel with my favorite poem, “Meditation on Yellow”, on a piece of paper, tucked inside?

Still undecided. Will report back.